Tag Archives: leadership

BEING A TRUSTED ADVISOR

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

BEING A TRUSTED ADVISOR

The Trusted Advisor book covers trust-based relationships in a very systematic way, presents a trust process-model and describes it in action. 

The trust process-model has 5 stages (engage, listen, frame, envision and commit) and provides useful insights

The book is structured in 3 major parts: 

 

Part 1 – Perspectives on trust

Part 2 – The structure of trust building

Part 3 – Putting trust to work

 


Part 1 – Perspectives on trust

 

1) What would be the benefits if your clients /colleagues  trusted you more? What are the primary characteristics of a trusted advisor?

2) What is a Trusted Advisor? (What do great trusted advisors all seem to do?)

3) Earning Trust (What are the dynamics of trusting and being trusted?)

4) How to give advice (How do you ensure your advice is listened to?)

5) The rules of Romance: Relationship building (What are the principles of building strong relationships?)

6) The importance of mindsets (What attitude must you have to be effective?)

7) Sincerity or technique? (Do you really have to care for those you advise?)

Part 2 – The structure of trust building 

8) The trust equation (What are the four key components that determine the extent of trust?)

9) The development of trust (What are the 5 stages of trust-building?)

10) Engagement (How do you get clients to initiate discussions with you?)

11) The art of listening (How can you improve your listening skills?)

12) Framing the issue (How can you help clients look at their issues in a fresh way?)

13) Envisioning an alternate reality (How can you help clients clarify what they’re really after?)

14) Commitment(How do you ensure clients are willing to do what it takes to solve their problems?)

Part 3 – Putting trust to work 

15) What’s so hard about all this? (Why are truly trust-based relationships so scarce?)

16) Different client types (How do you deal with clients of differing types?)

17) The Lieutenant Columbo approach (What can we learn from an unorthodox winner?)

18) The role of trust in getting hired (How do you create trust at the outset of a relationship?)

19) Building trust on the current assignment (How can you conduct your assignment in a way that adds to trust?)

20) Re-earning trust away from the current assignment (How can we build trust when you’re not working on an assignment?)

21) The case of cross-selling (Why is cross-selling so hard, and what can be done about it?)

22) The Quick-impact list to gain trust (What are the key things you should do first?)

 


The quick impact list to gain trust includes:

 

·         Listen to everything

·         Empathise

·         Note what the other person is feeling

·         Build a shared agenda

·         Take a personal risk

·         Ask about a related area

·         Ask great questions

·         Give away ideas

·         Return calls fast

·         Relax your mind

 

The approach also develops a Trust Equation:

 

       T = C + R + I  

      —————

                  S

 

Where: 

T= trustworthiness

C=credibility ( words)

R=reliability.  (action)

I =intimacy.    (emotions)

S= self orientation. ( motives)

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LEADERSHIP AND SIGNATURE PRESENCE

SIGNATURE PRESENCE

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“The person who removes a mountain begins by carrying away small stones.” Chinese Proverb

View Peter Cobbe's profile on LinkedIn

SIGNATURE PRESENCE : A study suggests that top leaders have 7 attributes that make them outstanding in their field. They are…

  • Technical Competence. This is  business literacy and a grasp of one’s field. If you don’t know the ins and outs of your business, you’re going to be at a serious disadvantage when facing the competition. Become an obsessive student of your business field until you know intimately how it works.
  • Conceptual Skills. This is a faculty for abstract thinking. It includes what Jonathan Swift called “seeing the invisible” ie visualising where people can go and what they can achieve. Practise taking time out just to play with your thoughts of where you and your team can go.
  • Track Record. This is a history of achieving results. Your track record enhances your credibility and therefore your authority. Don’t let any kind of achievement go by without recording it and using it to let people know you’re a person who gets results.
  • People Skills. Of all the people skills that you need to have to get people working with you, the top 3 are the ability to communicate, motivate, and delegate.Make up your mind to develop these three skills until you are a master.
  • Taste. The idea of “taste” is an intuitive sense of where talent lies. The great leaders are those who spot the potential right under their nose. When others just see people as resources on a balance sheet, successful leaders see them as potential to be developed. Get a taste for the talent in your team.
  • Judgment. Few leaders today are able to operate in perfect conditions. More often than not, they have to take decisions in imperfect conditions. That’s when their judgment comes into play. When time is short, when the data is lacking, great leaders rely on intuition to get them through. Make that sixth sense your best friend.
  • Character. Character means the qualities that define who you are. Not personality. Personality is your outward public face. But character is based on the values inside that matter more than anything else. Decide what yours are and how important they are to you.This establishes ” signature presence”

BOOKS ON LEADERSHIP EXCELLENCE

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LEADERSHIP QUOTES

  • “A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the quality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.” –Anonymous
  • “No person can be a great leader unless he takes genuine joy in the successes of those under him.” –W. H. Auden
  • “Good leaders make people feel that they’re at the very heart of things, not at the periphery. Everyone feels that he or she makes a difference to the success of the organization. When that happens people feel centered and that gives their work meaning.” –Warren Bennis
  • “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself, or to get all the credit for doing it.” — Andrew Carnegie
  • “A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” –Rosalynn Carter
  • “Perhaps the most central characteristic of authentic leadership is the relinquishing of the impulse to dominate others.” –David Cooper
  • “The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality.” — Max DePree
  • “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” –Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • “A boss creates fear, a leader confidence. A boss fixes blame, a leader corrects mistakes. A boss knows all, a leader asks questions. A boss makes work drudgery, a leader makes it interesting. A boss is interested in himself or herself, a leader is interested in the group.” –Russell H. Ewing
  • “Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions. ” — Harold Geneen
  • “One of the true tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.” –Arnold Glasow
  • “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. ” — John Kenneth Galbraith
  • “The very essence of leadership is that you have to have vision. You can’t blow an uncertain trumpet.” –Theodore Hesburgh
  • “The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men the conviction and the will to carry on… The genius of a good leader is to leave behind him a situation which common sense, without the grace of genius, can deal with successfully.” –Walter Lippmann
  • “Leadership is getting someone to do what they don’t want to do, to achieve what they want to achieve.” –Tom Landry
  • “Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.” –John Maxwell
  • “The real leader has no need to lead– he is content to point the way.” — Henry Miller
  • “The leader must know, most know that he knows, and must be able to make it abundantly clear to those about him that he knows.” –Clarence B. Randall
  • “The person who know “how” will always have job. The person who knows “why” will always be his boss.” –Diane Ravitch
  • “A true leader is hated by most, and respected by all. A follower is liked by all, and respected by none.” –Scott Smigler
  • “Integrity is the most valuable and respected quality of leadership. Always keep your word.” –Brian Tracey
  • “You know what makes leadership? It is the ability to get men to do what they don’t want to do and like it.” –Harry S. Truman
  • “Leadership is not the private reserve of a few charismatic men and women. It is a process ordinary people use when they are bringing forth the best from themselves and others.” –Unknown
  • “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.” –Thomas J. Watson
  • “Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it’s amazing what they can accomplish.” –Sam Walton

View Peter Cobbe's profile on LinkedIn

5 KEY ATTRIBUTES OF TOP PERFORMING MANAGERS

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5 KEY ATTRIBUTES

Line managers have a key role in building trust and engagement in the organisation. In his article on The Power of Great Managers, Towers Watson’s Global Practice Leader Adam Zuckerman identified the five key attributes of top-performing managers:

Tower’s Watson’s five key attributes of top-performing managers:

  • Crafting jobsdeveloping roles that are challenging, fulfilling, energising and achievable
  • Developing people: crafting personalised plans focused on an individual’s long-term growth and development
  • Delivering the deal: ensuring employees are rewarded for their efforts using the entire portfolio of intrinsic rewards at their disposal
  • Energising change: building the organisation’s resilience to change by developing the individual’s understanding of and ability to cope with the entire spectrum of change
  • Authenticity and trustacting as a role model of humility, intellectual honesty, interpersonal sensitivity and behavioral consistency.

Looking across the model’s components, we can clearly see a common theme: Effective managers understand what each individual requires and leverage the organisational systems to deliver it.

This means paying attention to each person’s talents and interests, and customising their work, their development opportunities and their rewards accordingly.

The model predicts these actions will improve sustainable engagement and, therefore, business performance. Of course, it is always desirable to test these assertions and examine their unique aspects inside each company by incorporating questions like those found in the table below into your next engagement survey.

The Power of Great Managers

COMPASS

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  • NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetings
  • My career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
    I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
    Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
    Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
    First 100 days
    Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
    Coaching for powerful presentations
    Life Coaching
    Executive advice on staff insight surveys
    Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
    Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
    Communications strategy
    Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
    Confidence&Self Esteem
    Creativity coaching
    Independent Consulting propositions coaching
    Non Executive director coaching
    Business Report/White Paper writing
    Graduate career coaching

Just a thought :

Five frogs are sitting on a log.
Four decide to jump off. How many are left? 

Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.

Mark Feldman

For a free exploratory discussion on 1 to 1 or Group Session coaching contact me on:

cobbep@gmail.com

or

via  my Linked In Profile

THE PRACTICE MODEL FOR COACHING

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PRACTICE MODEL

A SOLUTION FOCUSED APPROACH
STEP QUESTIONS/STATEMENTS CLIENT ACTIONS
1. Problem identification What is the issue or concern that you would like to discuss?

What would you like to change?

Are there any exceptions when it is not a problem/ issue?

How will we know when the situation ahs improved?

On a scale of 0 -10 how near are you now to resolving the problem ( where 10 is fully solved) ?

If you woke up tomorrow and this issue/problem no longer existed what would you notice that was different?

2. Realistic, relevant goals ( SMART) What do you want to achieve?

Lets develop SMART goals.

3. Alternative solutions generated What are your options?

Lets note them down.

4. Consideration of consequences What could happen?

How useful is each possible solution?

Set this up using life dimensions and rating 0 to 10 where 10 is extremely useful.

5. Target most feasible solution Having evaluated possible solutions what is the most feasible/practical solution?
6. Implementation of Chosen solutions Lets break down the solution into manageable steps so that it can be implemented

Now go and do it

7. Evaluation How successful was it?

Rating scale 0-10 where 10 is totally successful

What can be learnt?

What should we do next or can we finish coaching now?

SEE ASSOCIATION FOR COACHING PAPER BY STEPHEN PALMER

LEADERSHIP & INNOVATION

COMPASS

PETER COBBE COACHING

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Leadership and Innovation / Change: Breaking the Rules

A point of view   by  Karim Jaude 

We often think of innovation as creativity, but as Harvard professor Theodore Levitt points out, the difference between innovation and creativity is the difference between thinking about getting things done in the world, and getting things done. Creativity thinks up new things, innovation does new things.

Innovation drives the heart of every exceptional business.

Innovation continually poses the question, What stands in the way of my customer getting what he wants from my business?

For the innovation to be meaningful, it must always take the customers point of view. At the same time, innovation focuses your business on its critical essentials. It should make things easier in the operation of your business; otherwise, it is not innovation, but complication. Innovation helps your business identify itself and establish its individuality. This skill, developed within your business and your people, constantly asks, How can we do this better/best?

In that regard, I think of innovation as the best way skill. It produces a high level of energy in every organization within which it is nurtured, fed and stimulated. This energy in turn feeds everyone the organization touches: its employees, customers, suppliers, lenders, and investors. In an innovative organization, everyone grows.

Peter Drucker defines innovation as change that creates a new dimension of performance. Leaders can create environments, give people the tools, and set the expectations to make innovation part of daily work. They should take the time to explain to their teams that they must abandon practices that no longer work.

While great leaders in the world might seem to have little in common, they all excel at turning every team members talent into palpable performance and they do not hesitate to break virtually every rule held sacred by conventional wisdom.

Leaders know that the business climate is in permanent flux and that different approaches to lead people are necessary. They must be open to new opportunities, find ways to be innovative, and be willing to change..

As leaders release the power of innovation, they must also be constantly adapting policies, procedures, and even processes to make room for these dynamic changes. Here are seven ideas to consider when implementing innovation and change in your organization:

1. Vision and Goals The best way to predict the future is to create it. Do not hesitate to break virtually every rule held sacred by conventional wisdom. Develop goals and measurements that reinforce innovation and change.

2. Old vs. New Rules Eliminate rules and policies that hinder the change and create new ones that reinforce the desired way of operating. The old principle that states, if it is not broken, do not fix it, has never been effective. A visionary leader will break it and fix it by creating a new and better way to do it.

3. Training A great leader excels at turning each team members talent into performance. Replace training that reinforces the old way of doing things with new training.

4. Rewards and Recognition Find the right fit for each person, so that rewards and recognition are based on performance. Make rewards specific to the change goals that have been set. Recognize individual and team
contributions to making the changes work.

5. Communications Deliver communications in new ways to show commitment to innovation and change. Use multiple channels to deliver consistent messages to everyone in the organization, at all stages during the transition: before, during and after.

6. Environment Make sure the environment reflects the change. Create an atmosphere that fosters innovation and change. Leaders should allow the team to make lots of tries and consequently suffer some failure or the
organization won’t learn.

7. Organizational structure The structure should reinforce the operational changes. Define the right outcomes, rather than the right steps. Combine overlapping divisions, eliminate duplication, re-organize around customers
as opposed to functions.

Article Source: http://www.leadershiparticles.net

USEFUL RELATED LINKS :

EXCELLENT TED VIDEO TALK ON How Great Leaders Inspire Action  Simon Sinek

21 LAWS OF LEADERSHIP

GREAT LEADERSHIP BOOKS

MORE LEADERSHIP INSIGHTS:

Leadership Style

Putting “Development “back in Leadership Development

Improved business writing and report skills

Personal Brand insights

How to Really Understand Others

Think Trust

Team Curiosity

Seven elements of Leadership

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BRAINSTORMING AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT

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BRAINSTEERING

One aspect of change management involves the use of brainstorming .

In Kevin and Shawn Coyne’s book : BRAINSTEERING: A Better Approach to Breakthrough Ideas  some new ideas are provided for more effective brainstorming  based on the proposition that many attempts at brainstorming are doomed . The flow of ideas may be fast and furious with traditional brainstorming but they can be ultimately shallow

The authors propose seven main principles that  inform a ” brainsteering” approach . A more structured but not constraining approach.

  1. Know your organisations decision making criteria : this considers the  company will use to make decisions about any ideas generated. There is a need to understand existing strategic and tactical aims.For example ideas used may need to be practical, affordable and profitable within a year .

2, Ask the right questions : Academic research implies that  loosely structured sessions are inferior to approaches that use structure as the best way is to use questions as the platform for ideas generation. /for example the authors suggest that 15 -20 questions are appropriate for a workshop attended by about 20 people.Typical questions might be around trying to understand the customer experience , how to reduce complexity, what existing policies and procedures should be challenged.

  1. Choose the right people :  Pick the people who can answer the questions you are posing and have regard for their special knowledge.
  2. Divide and Conquer : Don’t hold on rambling discussion – break into sub groups of 3-5 people ( no fewer and no more based on the idea that the social norm is to  speak up in smaller rather than larger groups) and let them focus on one question for 30 minutes . So overall take the 15 -20 questions and split them between the subgroups ( about 5 questions each) .Furthermore where possible assign questions to groups that are best able to handle them.
  3. On your marks ,get set,go ! : Orient the full group by clarifying expectations . Prepare participants for the possibility that they might only generate 2-3 worthy ideas and that this is balanced by the fact that by the need of the day all of the sub groups will have generated a wealth of ideas.

6.Wrap it up : By the end of a typical day each subgroup tends to produce about 15 interesting ideas for further exploration so there could be 60 ideas generated by a 20 person team . Have each subgroup narrow its list of ideas to a top few and then share all of the top ideas with the whole group to motivate and inspire all participants. the group should not pick winners or a winner. Close the day on a high note and describe exactly what steps will be taken to choose winning ideas and how they will learn about final decisions.

  1. Follow up quickly : Decisions and other follow up activities should be rapid, well managed and thorough. Concrete action generated from brainstorm sessions can decline quickly as time passes and the momentum is lost. This part of the process must be clearly in place and agreed before any brainsteering session. There should be excellent communication to all participants covering all of the ideas and the rationale for selection and rejection at this stage.

The overall thinking behind this approach is that whilst traditional brainstorming is fast and furious it can be ultimately shallow. By using a more focused,question based approach their is an opportunity to capture better ideas from participants

The Six Change Approaches of Kotter and Schlesinger considers ways to minimise resistance to change in organisations

According to Kotter and Schlesinger there are four major reasons why people resist change:

  1. Parochial self-interest  where people are concerned with the impact change for themselves and how it may affect  their own interests
  2. Misunderstanding  including communication problems and  inadequate information
  3. Low tolerance to change  where some  people are concerned about security and stability in their work
  4.  Different assessments of the situation  where some people may disagree on the reasons for change and on the advantages and disadvantages of the change process

Kotter and Schlesinger set out six change approaches to deal with resistance to change:

  1. Education and Communication – Where there is a lack of information or inaccurate information and analysis. One of the best ways to overcome resistance to change is to educate people about the change effort beforehand. Quality communication and education helps people understand the logic of the change effort  and minimises  rumours
  2. Participation and Involvement – When people are involved in the change effort they are more likely to buy into change rather than resist it. This approach is likely to lower resistance and prevent passive acquiescence to change.
  3. Facilitation and Support –Leadership support helps people deal with fear and anxiety during a transition period. This approach is concerned with provision of special training, counselling, outlets for concerns
  4. Negotiation and Agreement – Where someone or some group may lose out in a change and where that individual or group has considerable power to resist. Managers can combat resistance by offering incentives to employees not to resist change. This can be done by allowing change resistors to veto elements of change that are threatening, or change resistors can be offered incentives to leave the company through early buyouts or retirements in order to avoid having to experience the change effort. This approach will be appropriate where those resisting change are in a position of power.
  5. Manipulation and Co-option – Where other tactics will not work or are too expensive. Kotter and Schlesinger suggest that an effective manipulation technique is to co-opt with resisters. Co-option may involve selecting leaders of the resisters to participate in the change effort. These leaders can be given a symbolic role in decision making without threatening the change effort.
  6. Explicit and Implicit Coercion – Where speed is essential and only to be used only as last resort. Managers can explicitly or implicitly force people into accepting change by making clear that resisting change can lead to negative outcomes such as job loss, firing, transferring or lack of promotion prospects.

See more on change management in Coaching Cosmos Newsletters

The Burke Litwin Model

Elements to include in a change campaign

Conversations enable change not edicts

Appreciative inquiry for change leaders

An approach to stakeholder engagement

Business Case Development Insights

The Kotter 8 step change process

The Link between change management and leadership

The Transformation Story

A new look at Brainstorming ( Brainsteering)  & Dealing with Resistance to Change

The ADKAR model of Change

The Futures Wheel

Four Principles for Staying in Control

Change Management Phases

Measuring the impact of change – KPIs

Resistance to Change by Rick Maurer

Time management and better use of resources

Insights on establishing credibility

Elements to include in a change campaign

Report Writing skills

Underpinning Successful Change

Road Test your Business Case

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Blake Mouton Leadership Model

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Some leaders are very task-oriented; they simply want to get things done.

Others are very people-oriented; they want people to be happy.

And others are a combination of the two.

If you prefer to lead by setting and enforcing tight schedules, you tend to be more production-oriented (or task-oriented). If you make people your priority and try to accommodate employee needs, then you’re more people-oriented.

Neither preference is right or wrong, just as no one type of leadership style is best for all situations. However, it’s useful to understand what your natural leadership tendencies are, so that you can then working on developing skills that you may be missing.

 

A popular framework for thinking about a leader’s ‘task versus person’ orientation was developed by Robert Blake and Jane Mouton in the early 1960s. Called the Managerial Grid, or Leadership Grid, it plots the degree of task-centeredness versus person-centeredness and identifies five combinations as distinct leadership styles.

Understanding the Model The Managerial Grid is based on two behavioral dimensions:

* Concern for People This is the degree to which a leader considers the needs of team members, their interests, and areas of personal development when deciding how best to accomplish a task

* Concern for Production – This is the degree to which a leader emphasizes concrete objectives, organizational efficiency and high productivity when deciding how best to accomplish a task.

Using the axis to plot leadership ‘concerns for production’ versus ‘concerns for people’, Blake and Mouton defined the following five leadership styles:

Country Club Leadership – High People/Low Production This style of leader is most concerned about the needs and feelings of members of his/her team. These people operate under the assumption that as long as team members are happy and secure then they will work hard. What tends to result is a work environment that is very relaxed and fun but where production suffers due to lack of direction and control.

Produce or Perish Leadership – High Production/Low People Also known as Authoritarian or Compliance Leaders, people in this category believe that employees are simply a means to an end. Employee needs are always secondary to the need for efficient and productive workplaces. This type of leader is very autocratic, has strict work rules, policies, and procedures, and views punishment as the most effective means to motivate employees.

Impoverished Leadership – Low Production/Low People This leader is mostly ineffective. He/she has neither a high regard for creating systems for getting the job done, nor for creating a work environment that is satisfying and motivating. The result is a place of disorganization, dissatisfaction and disharmony.

Middle-of-the-Road Leadership – Medium Production/Medium People This style seems to be a balance of the two competing concerns. It may at first appear to be an ideal compromise. Therein lies the problem, though: When you compromise, you necessarily give away a bit of each concern so that neither production nor people needs are fully met. Leaders who use this style settle for average results and often believe that this is the most anyone can expect.

Team Leadership – High Production/High People According to the Blake Mouton model, this is the pinnacle of managerial style. These leaders stress production needs and the needs of the people equally highly. The premise here is that employees are involved in understanding organizational purpose and determining production needs. When employees are committed to, and have a stake in the organization’s success, their needs and production needs coincide.

This creates a team environment based on trust and respect, which leads to high satisfaction and motivation and, as a result, high production.

Applying the Blake Mouton Managerial Grid Being aware of the various approaches is the first step in understanding and improving how well you perform as a manager. It is important to understand how you currently operate, so that you can then identify ways of becoming competent in both realms.

Step One: Identify your leadership style.

* Think of some recent situations where you were the leader.

* For each of these situations, place yourself in the grid according to where you believe you fit.

Step Two: Identify areas of improvement and develop your leadership skills

* Look at your current leadership method and critically analyze its effectiveness.

* Look at ways you can improve. Are you settling for ‘middle of the road’ because it is easier than reaching for more?

* Identify ways to get the skills you need to reach the Team Leadership position. These may include involving others in problem solving or improving how you communicate with them, if you feel you are too task-oriented. Or it may mean becoming clearer about scheduling or monitoring project progress if you tend to focus too much on people.

* Continually monitor the way you work and watch for situations when you slip back into unhelpful habits. Step Three: Put the Grid in Context It is important to recognize that the Team Leadership style isn’t always the most effective approach in every situation. While the benefits of democratic and participative management are universally accepted, there are times that call for more attention in one area than another.

If your company is in the midst of a merger or some other significant change, it is often acceptable to place a higher emphasis on people than on production. Likewise, when faced with an economic hardship or physical risk, people concerns may be placed on the back burner, for the short-term at least, to achieve high productivity and efficiency.

Note: Theories of leadership have moved on a certain amount since the Blake Mouton Grid was originally proposed. In particular, the context in which leadership occurs is seen as an important driver of the leadership style used. And in many situations, the “Team Leader” as an ideal has moved to the ideal of the “Transformational Leader”:

Someone who, according to leadership researcher Bernard Bass:

* Is a model of integrity and fairness;

* Sets clear goals;

* Has high expectations;

* Encourages;

* Provides support and recognition;

* Stirs people’s emotions;

* Gets people to look beyond their self-interest; and

* Inspires people to reach for the improbable.

SUMMARY

The Blake Mouton Managerial Grid is a practical and useful framework that helps you think about your leadership style.

By plotting ‘concern for production’ against ‘concern for people’, the grid highlights how placing too much emphasis in one area at the expense of the other leads to low overall productivity.

The model proposes that when both people and production concerns are high, employee engagement and productivity increases accordingly. This is often true, and it follows the ideas of Theories X and Y, and other participative management theories.

While the grid does not entirely address the complexity of “Which leadership style is best?”, it certainly provides an excellent starting place to critically analyze your skills and improve your general leadership skills.

See also the LEADERSHIP AGILITY model

I provide excellent leadership coaching for managers and senior executives aiming to develop new levels of impact and enjoyment in their role . See my proposition and details here : Peter Cobbe Coaching

The approach is based on careful diagnostics and then a customised programme to suit very specific individual needs and current work challenges . The end result is evolution in leadership style and impact.

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SIGNATURE PRESENCE and LEADERS

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

SIGNATURE PRESENCE : A study suggests that top leaders have 7 attributes that make them outstanding in their field.

They are…

  1. Technical Competence. This is  business literacy and a grasp of one’s field. If you don’t know the ins and outs of your business, you’re going to be at a serious disadvantage when facing the competition. Become an obsessive student of your business field until you know intimately how it works.
  2. Conceptual Skills. This is a faculty for abstract thinking. It includes what Jonathan Swift called“seeing the invisible” ie visualising where people can go and what they can achieve. Practise taking time out just to play with your thoughts of where you and your team can go.
  3. Track Record. This is a history of achieving results. Your track record enhances your credibility and therefore your authority. Don’t let any kind of achievement go by without recording it and using it to let people know you’re a person who gets results.
  4. People Skills. Of all the people skills that you need to have to get people working with you, the top 3 are the ability to communicate, motivate, and delegate.Make up your mind to develop these three skills until you are a master.
  5. Taste. The idea of “taste” is an intuitive sense of where talent lies. The great leaders are those who spot the potential right under their nose. When others just see people as resources on a balance sheet, successful leaders see them as potential to be developed. Get a taste for the talent in your team.
  6. Judgment. Few leaders today are able to operate in perfect conditions. More often than not, they have to take decisions in imperfect conditions. That’s when their judgment comes into play. When time is short, when the data is lacking, great leaders rely on intuition to get them through. Make that sixth sense your best friend.
  7. Character. Character means the qualities that define who you are. Not personality. Personality is your outward public face. But character is based on the values inside that matter more than anything else. Decide what yours are and how important they are to you.This establishes ” signature presence”

BOOKS ON LEADERSHIP EXCELLENCE

LEADERSHIP QUOTES

  1. “A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the quality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.” –Anonymous
  2. “No person can be a great leader unless he takes genuine joy in the successes of those under him.” –W. H. Auden
  3. “Good leaders make people feel that they’re at the very heart of things, not at the periphery. Everyone feels that he or she makes a difference to the success of the organization. When that happens people feel centered and that gives their work meaning.” –Warren Bennis
  4. “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself, or to get all the credit for doing it.” — Andrew Carnegie
  5. “A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” –Rosalynn Carter
  6. “Perhaps the most central characteristic of authentic leadership is the relinquishing of the impulse to dominate others.” –David Cooper
  7. “The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality.” — Max DePree
  8. “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” –Dwight D. Eisenhower
  9. “A boss creates fear, a leader confidence. A boss fixes blame, a leader corrects mistakes. A boss knows all, a leader asks questions. A boss makes work drudgery, a leader makes it interesting. A boss is interested in himself or herself, a leader is interested in the group.” –Russell H. Ewing
  10. “Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions. ” — Harold Geneen
  11. “One of the true tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.” –Arnold Glasow
  12. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. ” — John Kenneth Galbraith
  13. “The very essence of leadership is that you have to have vision. You can’t blow an uncertain trumpet.” –Theodore Hesburgh
  14. “The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men the conviction and the will to carry on… The genius of a good leader is to leave behind him a situation which common sense, without the grace of genius, can deal with successfully.” –Walter Lippmann
  15. “Leadership is getting someone to do what they don’t want to do, to achieve what they want to achieve.” –Tom Landry
  16. “Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.” –John Maxwell
  17. “The real leader has no need to lead– he is content to point the way.” — Henry Miller
  18. “The leader must know, most know that he knows, and must be able to make it abundantly clear to those about him that he knows.” –Clarence B. Randall
  19. “The person who know “how” will always have job. The person who knows “why” will always be his boss.” –Diane Ravitch
  20. “A true leader is hated by most, and respected by all. A follower is liked by all, and respected by none.” –Scott Smigler
  21. “Integrity is the most valuable and respected quality of leadership. Always keep your word.” –Brian Tracey
  22. “You know what makes leadership? It is the ability to get men to do what they don’t want to do and like it.” –Harry S. Truman
  23. “Leadership is not the private reserve of a few charismatic men and women. It is a process ordinary people use when they are bringing forth the best from themselves and others.” –Unknown
  24. “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.” –Thomas J. Watson
  25. “Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it’s amazing what they can accomplish.” –Sam Walton

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership

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The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership by Dr John Maxwell, is an insightful book on the subject of leadership and growing your influence.

Each of the 21 irrefutable laws, relates to some specific principle that not only helps you become a better leader, someone others enjoy following, but if you put them into practice in your daily life, you will find they also help you to simply become a better individual.

Here is  a short overview of each of the 21 irrefutable laws of leadership using excerpts from the book.

 1. The Law of the lid. Your leadership is like a lid or a ceiling on your organization. Your church or business will not rise beyond the level your leadership allows. That’s why when a corporation or team needs to be fixed, they fire the leader.

2. The Law of Influence. Leadership is simply about influencing people. Nothing more, nothing less. The true test of a leader is to ask him to create positive change in an organization. If you cannot create change, you cannot lead. Being a leader is not about being first, or being an entrepreneur, or being the most knowledgeable, or being a manager. Being a leader is not just holding a leadership position.

 3. The Law of Process. Leadership is learned over time. And it can be learned. People skills, emotional strength, vision, momentum, and timing are all areas that can and should be learned. Leaders are always learners.

4. The Law of Navigation. Anyone can steer the ship, but it takes a leader to chart the course. Vision is defined as the ability to see the whole trip before leaving the dock. A leader will also see obstacles before others do. A leader sees more, sees farther, and sees before others. A navigator (leader) listens; he finds out about grassroots level reactions. Navigators balance optimism with realism. Preparation is the key to good navigation. It’s not the size of the project, it’s the size of the leader that counts.

5. The Law of E.F. Hutton. Hutton was America’s most influential stock market analyst. When he spoke, everyone listened. When real leaders speak, people automatically listen. Conversely, in any group or church, you can identify the real leaders by looking for those who people listen to.

6. The Law of Solid Ground. Trust is the foundation for all effective leadership. When it comes to leadership, there are no shortcuts. Building trust requires competence, connection and character.

7.The Law of Respect. People naturally follow people stronger than themselves. Even natural leaders tend to fall in behind those who they sense have a higher leadership quotient than themselves.

8. The Law of Intuition. Leaders evaluate everything with a Leadership bias. Leaders see trends, resources and problems, and can read people.

9. The Law of Magnetism. Leaders attract people like themselves. Who you are is who you attract. Work to attract leaders rather than followers if you want to build a truly strong organization.

10. The Law of Connection. You must touch the heart before you ask people to follow. Communicate on the level of emotion first to make a personal connection.

11. The Law of the Inner Circle. A leader’s potential is determined by those closest to him. “The leader finds greatness in the group, and helps the members find it in themselves”.

12. The Law of Empowerment. Only secure leaders give power to others. Mark Twain said, Great things can happen when you don’t care who gets the credit. Another point to ponder – Great leaders gain authority by giving it away.

13. The Law of Reproduction. It takes a leader to raise up a leader. Followers can’t do it, and neither can institutional programs It takes one to know one, to show one, to grow one. The potential of an organization depends on the growth of its leadership.

14. The Law of Buy-In. People buy in to the leader first, then the vision. If they don’t like the leader but like the vision, they get a new leader. If they don’t like the leader or the vision, they get a new leader. If they don’t like the vision but like the leader, they get a new vision.

15. The Law of Victory. Leaders find a way for the team to win. You can’t win WITHOUT good athletes, but you CAN lose with them. Unity of vision, diversity of skills plus a leader are needed for a win.

16. The Law of Momentum. You can’t steer a ship that isn’t moving forward. It takes a leader to create forward motion.

17. The Law of Priorities. Activity is not necessarily accomplishment. We need to learn the difference. A leader is the one who climbs the tallest tree, surveys the entire situation, and yells – Wrong Jungle!

18. The Law of Sacrifice. A leader must give up to go up. Successful leaders must maintain an attitude of sacrifice to turn around an organization. When you become a leader, you lose the right to think about yourself.

19. The Law of Timing. When to lead is as important as what to do and where to go. Only the right action at the right time will bring success.

20. The Law of Explosive Growth. To add growth, lead followers. To multiply growth, lead leaders. It is my job to build the people who are going to build the company.

21. The Law of Legacy. A leader’s lasting value is measured by succession. Leadership is the one thing you can’t delegate. You either exercise it – or abdicate it.

MORE GREAT BOOKS ON LEADERSHIP

FOR LEADERSHIP COACHING CONTACT ME : PETER COBBE COACHING

COMPASS

Leadership development and growth

Whenever I am working with clients on their leadership development we use several models and insights to establish their current state/approach.


From this and other approaches we produce a customised plan that is pragmatic and realistic for the individual involved. One set of insights considers leadership theories: 

Experts have been trying to define leadership via several aspects for many years. These schools of thought are not mutually exclusive and  share some common ground. Collectively, they do give you a sense of how you can define leadership for yourself and apply those that work for you in your quest for career success.

1. Traits Theory

People who believe that leaders are born are likely to buy into the Traits Theory. This theory basically centres itself on the leader. What are the qualities of a leader? Now if you look at the different leaders of the world, companies or armies they all carry certain traits. It is believed that if one carries these characteristics then one is likely to become a leader.

So, this theory defines what are the qualities that a leader should posses rather than leadership. If one is a leader then theseleadership traits should be present.

2. Behavioural Theory

How would you define leadership if you believe in the Behavioural Theory? This group of experts concentrated on what the leaders did in relation to their followers. While the previous theory spoke about qualities of a leader, this theory approached it from the angle of style.

This theory grouped different forms of behaviour leaders have towards their followers into various sections. In many management classes and leadership courses you will come across terms like leaders who are “Task Oriented” or “People Oriented”. You will also come across phrases like “Directive Leadership” and “Participative Leadership”.

3. Contingency Theory

While the first two theories define leadership via traits and styles – the Contingency Theory takes in consideration the weaknesses of the previous theories. Since leadership functions in a dynamic situation, it is only logical that different styles and traits will work in different situations. The Contingency Theory takes into consideration the context where leadership is exercised.

Core to this approach is a myriad of factors that determines whether a leader becomes effective or otherwise. If you define leadership as such, then in your course of career growth you would take into consideration what styles and traits works the best in a given situation.

4. Transformational Theory

Someone from the Transformational Theory would define leadership from the angle of the leader as a change agent. They look at the effects of the leader towards his followers. There are 3 ways how a leader can change their followers – intensifying the level of awareness about the importance of the task and how to achieve it, focusing the team on the bigger goals of the unit rather than individual goals and to motivate the followers into a higher-order need (e.g., Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs).

Charisma is seen as an important aspect in this theory. It is believed that charisma affects followers by stirring their strong emotions and allowing followers to identify with their leaders.

As you can see, there are many definitions of leadership. It is important for you to have a good understanding of what is leadership as your career grows. Eventually you will find yourself leading a project or a team and these learning will come in handy.

It is never too early to start developing leadership skills. As someone new in the workplace, you may aspire to become the leader of your organization some day. Some people believe leaders are born not made

It is possible to develop leadership skills  If you accept the fact leaders behave in a certain manner, then it is possible to learn the behaviours of a leader. People follow leaders because they have gained their trust and earned their respect.

1. Integrity

Leaders have high ethics. They are honest. If you are to gain people’s trust then it is important to learn this trait early. Some of the actual situations you can practice this behaviour is taking responsibility for your own actions. Do not play the blame game when things go wrong. Leaders take personal responsibility for their team’s actions and results.

2. Passionate

Leaders are passionate. They are enthusiastic about their work and they even have the ability to rub this energy off on their followers. Do you take on assignments given to you enthusiastically? This is one good behaviour to start when developing leadership skills.

3. Commitment

When developing leadership skills, look at the easiest to start. Commitment to your work is one of the easiest. Can you truly say you are willing to work hard at the job assigned? Leaders work hard and have a strong discipline in following through with their work.

4. Courageous

If people are to follow you then as a leader you need to be courageous. Leaders are brave when they confront risks and the unknown. The ultimate test of a leader’s courage is also the courage to be open. When looking at developing leadership skills, do you have the courage to speak up on things that matter?

5. Goal Oriented

Leaders are very focused on the objectives that need to be attained. They develop a plan and strategy to achieve the objectives. In addition, they will also need to build commitment from the team and rally them to achieve the organization’s goal. When developing leadership skills, start by looking at how goal oriented you are now. Improve upon that behaviour.

6. Developing People

Developing people whether by training, coaching or teaching them is one of the main traits of a good leader. No one can achieve organisational goals alone. The team is needed in order to achieve them. Leaders develop the people to build a stronger team so that the organization is effective. Start by developing your own knowledge when developing leadership skills.

7. Prioritise

Leaders do the most urgent and important things first regardless of their interest in them. For them, whatever that needs to be done should be completed with the best possible effort. How do you fare with this trait? Do you tasks that you are uncomfortable with? Start developing leadership skills  in this area by recognizing what are the important tasks to complete.

8. No Public Glory

Leaders understand that at best they will get private credit for their work. Public glory is not expected. They know whatever achievements are the result of joint effort of their units. They share glory and credit with the rest for the work. They know they are only as good as their team. When developing leadership skills, ask yourself this – are you generous enough to share the fruits of your unit’s achievements?

Developing leadership skills is a long process. Some people are born with such traits. They develop into leaders much faster. Leadership is also a set of behaviour as much as a skill. Hence, it is possible to learn leadership skills. Start now and when the opportunity arise you will be ready.

For customised leadership coaching  and free exploratory chat please contact me – cobbep@coachingcosmos.com


NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetings

My career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life. 

I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”

Specialties: 

  • Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
  • Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
  • Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
  • First 100 days 
  • Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
  • Coaching for powerful presentations
  • Life Coaching
  • Executive advice on staff insight surveys
  • Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
  • Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
  • Communications strategy
  • Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
  • Confidence&Self Esteem
  • Creativity coaching
  • Independent Consulting propositions coaching
  • Non Executive director coaching
  • Business Report/White Paper writing
  • Graduate career coaching

Just a thought :
Five frogs are sitting on a log.Four decide to jump off. How many are left? 
Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.
Mark Feldman