Category Archives: Personal development

Some questions to help inform your life

REFLECTIONS : Some questions to help inform your life

 

A year from now you will wish you had started today.

— Karen Lamb

“They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.”

– Andy Warhol

 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

The aim of these questions is to help stimulate insights and/or to help provide a new perspective.

 

  1. What are my core values and drivers right now?
  2. Who am I becoming?
  3. What am I settling for?
  4. Where do I focus my attention?
  5. How am I using my gifts?
  6. What would I like to learn right now
  7. What am I holding onto that I no longer need?
  8. How much time do I spend with people who inspire me?
  9. How much time do I spend with people that drain me?
  10. What would I do if I knew I couldn’t fail?
  11. How can I be happy in my career?
  12. How can I be sure that my relationship with my family is an enduring     source of happiness?
  13. How can I live my life with integrity?
  14. What one thing could I change for the better right now?
  15. Who do I need to speak to or seek help form to achieve any desired change(s)?
  16. How will I know that I have achieved a specific change?
  17. Do I need to prioritise or sequence these changes?
  18. Is there another question I want to ask to inform my thinking?

 

 

Putting it together (considering importance right now to you and interdependencies).

 

Questions What does this mean for me? What will I do?
What are my core values and drivers right now?

 

Who am I becoming?

 

What am I settling for?
Where do I focus my attention?
How am I using my gifts?

 

What would I like to learn right now?

 

What am I holding onto that I no longer need?

 

How much time do I spend with people who inspire me?

 

How much time do I spend with people that drain me?

 

What would I do if I knew I couldn’t fail?

 

How can I be happy in my career?
How can I be sure that my relationship with my family is an enduring source of happiness?
How can I live my life with integrity?
What one thing could I change for the better right now?

 

Who do I need to speak to or seek help from to achieve any desired change(s)?

 

How will I know that I have achieved a specific change?

 

Do I need to prioritise or sequence these changes?

 

Is there another question I want to ask to inform my thinking?

 

WHAT HAVE I LEARNED FROM CONSIDERING ALL OF THESE INSIGHTS?

 a09d4-dolphinweb

“The best thing you can do is the right thing; the next best thing you can do is the wrong thing; the worst thing you can do is nothing.” -Theodore Roosevelt

 

You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” –A.A. Milne

 

THINKING LIMITATIONS

DECISION MAKING INSIGHTS

RULES OF LIFE

CRITICAL THINKING – discover your thinking style

 

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

Peter Cobbe coaching

IMG_4817

View Peter Cobbe's profile on LinkedIn

  • NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetingsMy career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the  Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
    I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
  • Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
  • Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
  • Senior Executive mentoring
  • First 100 days
  • Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
  • Coaching for powerful presentations
  • Life Coaching
  • Executive advice on staff insight surveys
  • Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
  • Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
  • Communications strategy
  • Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
  • Confidence&Self Esteem
  • Creativity coaching
  • Independent Consulting propositions coaching
  • Non Executive director coaching
  • Business Report/White Paper writing
  • Graduate career coaching

Just a thought :

Five frogs are sitting on a log.
Four decide to jump off. How many are left? 

Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.

Mark Feldman

For a free exploratory discussion on 1 to 1 or GROUP learning/coaching sessions contact me on:

cobbep@gmail.com

or

via  my Linked In Profile

View Peter Cobbe's profile on LinkedIn

Advertisements

BEING A TRUSTED ADVISOR

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

BEING A TRUSTED ADVISOR

The Trusted Advisor book covers trust-based relationships in a very systematic way, presents a trust process-model and describes it in action. 

The trust process-model has 5 stages (engage, listen, frame, envision and commit) and provides useful insights

The book is structured in 3 major parts: 

 

Part 1 – Perspectives on trust

Part 2 – The structure of trust building

Part 3 – Putting trust to work

 


Part 1 – Perspectives on trust

 

1) What would be the benefits if your clients /colleagues  trusted you more? What are the primary characteristics of a trusted advisor?

2) What is a Trusted Advisor? (What do great trusted advisors all seem to do?)

3) Earning Trust (What are the dynamics of trusting and being trusted?)

4) How to give advice (How do you ensure your advice is listened to?)

5) The rules of Romance: Relationship building (What are the principles of building strong relationships?)

6) The importance of mindsets (What attitude must you have to be effective?)

7) Sincerity or technique? (Do you really have to care for those you advise?)

Part 2 – The structure of trust building 

8) The trust equation (What are the four key components that determine the extent of trust?)

9) The development of trust (What are the 5 stages of trust-building?)

10) Engagement (How do you get clients to initiate discussions with you?)

11) The art of listening (How can you improve your listening skills?)

12) Framing the issue (How can you help clients look at their issues in a fresh way?)

13) Envisioning an alternate reality (How can you help clients clarify what they’re really after?)

14) Commitment(How do you ensure clients are willing to do what it takes to solve their problems?)

Part 3 – Putting trust to work 

15) What’s so hard about all this? (Why are truly trust-based relationships so scarce?)

16) Different client types (How do you deal with clients of differing types?)

17) The Lieutenant Columbo approach (What can we learn from an unorthodox winner?)

18) The role of trust in getting hired (How do you create trust at the outset of a relationship?)

19) Building trust on the current assignment (How can you conduct your assignment in a way that adds to trust?)

20) Re-earning trust away from the current assignment (How can we build trust when you’re not working on an assignment?)

21) The case of cross-selling (Why is cross-selling so hard, and what can be done about it?)

22) The Quick-impact list to gain trust (What are the key things you should do first?)

 


The quick impact list to gain trust includes:

 

·         Listen to everything

·         Empathise

·         Note what the other person is feeling

·         Build a shared agenda

·         Take a personal risk

·         Ask about a related area

·         Ask great questions

·         Give away ideas

·         Return calls fast

·         Relax your mind

 

The approach also develops a Trust Equation:

 

       T = C + R + I  

      —————

                  S

 

Where: 

T= trustworthiness

C=credibility ( words)

R=reliability.  (action)

I =intimacy.    (emotions)

S= self orientation. ( motives)

a09d4-dolphinweb

PORTFOLIO LIFESTYLE / CAREER

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

One aspect of my coaching work with clients is to help them develop and implement a portfolio approach . Some of these shared insights may be of use to you: 

1. A portfolio career is the pursuit of more than one income source simultaneously, usually by applying the various skills you’ve developed throughout your career to different types of work. For example, you could combine consulting with part-time work, teaching at a local college and freelance writing. You could use your speaking and facilitation skills to lead workshops at companies or educational institutions. You could even develop your own product or service. 

2. A Portfolio lifestyle involves a balanced lifestyle including earning your income from a variety of sources. For example, you might work on freelance contracts or as a part-time employee for several organisations, and perhaps also run a business.

  • In this way of working income is gained from several sources
  • It is popular with those who have specific skills that are in demand by different organisations.
  •  At different times you might combine self-employment with, for example, short-term contracts or part-time, temporary or project work.
  •  Each job adds skills and experience to your portfolio.
  •  This type of work allows flexibility and can also be secure.
  •  A balance can be struck between paid and unpaid work and an improved lifestyle

Working with several clients I have noticed that some attributes or qualities help to underpin success including : 

  •  some risk tolerance and courage,
  •  high self motivation and resilience , 
  •  adequate personal finances
  • curious an interested in continuous personal development ,
  • good interpersonal , self marketing and networking skills, 
  •  seeking appropriate support from others
  • willingness to take on new challenges and 
  • able to multi task.

“The quality of your life is proportional to the quality of the questions you ask?”

Anthony Robbins

a09d4-dolphinweb

If you are considering a portfolio approach an effective initial stage is to reflect carefully and consider specific criteria:

  • What aspects of my personality  and values help me to be a good fit for specific components of my portfolio ?
  • What existing skills and experience should I capitalise on?
  • What interests or hobbies might I expand on or cultivate further?
  • What new education might I need to complete?
  •  What new skills or experience might I need if I want to include in my portfolio an area of interest or something totally new to me?
  •  How will I research and test different possibilities?
  •  What balance do I want between leisure,family,friends and work time ?
  •  What are my financial requirements  in order to support myself and my family?
  • What resources and support can I call on as I make this journey?
  •  What  financial investment might I need?
  •  What systems and infrastructure will I need in place? 
  •  Can I generate passive sources of income?

GUIDING  THOUGHT :   STOP ,THINK and then ACT when well informed – there are 168 hours in a week  ( and typically for one third of that we sleep!)  –  so how many of your  approximately 100 waking  hours will you spend on each component ?

SAM_1835

PROCESS

  • Consider the vision for your initial portfolio – What do you want more of and less of in your life?
  • Understand the requirements for each component
  • Analyse the gap between your current knowledge and skills and the portfolio component
  • Consider how to fill the gap ( Education , Training, Reading, Working in a similar business to learn the ropes ,Speaking to people working in that area , etc.)
  •  SELECT FROM OPTIONS DEVELOPED

An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory  – Engels

Having thought through and settled on at least some initial portfolio components you are ready to:

  • Research the enablers for that option
  •  Understand the time commitments involved
  • Estimate any costs involved and income generated  where appropriate
  • Develop an implementation plan
  • Move to implementation – learning as you do so

Action Process

Using the knowledge gained from your planning and preparation establish the components of your initial portfolio based on the best mix for you right now .

For example this could be any mix of components such as   :

  •  Own business ( wide range of possibilities)
  •  Franchise ( wide range of possibilities)
  • Non Executive Director
  •  Interim Management
  • Contract/Temporary work
  •  Consultancy
  •  Coaching in various fields
  •  Charity paid and unpaid work
  •  Voluntary work
  •  Magistrate
  •  Local Politics
  •  Trustee roles
  • Writing – technical /fiction

This is the secret – the repertoire. You have to try to consolidate your repertoire. It is a big step if you know how to do that.  Cecilia Bartoli

A portfolio approach implies an ongoing , flexible and evolving journey. The components of your portfolio can change and evolve. Consolidation, nurturing, sustaining and developing become essential drivers

Some components can be removed if they are not meeting your needs or criteria.

New components can be added as you learn more and discover new possibilities.

In this sense it is worth reviewing and evaluating progress at key stages to see what needs to change as well as being constantly curious and actively researching new possibilities.

View Peter Cobbe's profile on LinkedIn

AC_Logo_Main_LOW_IMG_1573

  • NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetingsMy career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the  Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
    I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
  • Achieving a portfolio lifestyle
  • Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
  • Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
  • Senior Executive mentoring
  • First 100 days
  • Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
  • Coaching for powerful presentations
  • Life Coaching
  • Executive advice on staff insight surveys
  • Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
  • Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
  • Communications strategy
  • Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
  • Confidence&Self Esteem
  • Creativity coaching
  • Independent Consulting propositions coaching
  • Non Executive director coaching
  • Business Report/White Paper writing
  • Graduate career coaching

Just a thought :

Five frogs are sitting on a log.
Four decide to jump off. How many are left? 

Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.

Mark Feldman

For a free exploratory discussion on 1 to 1 or GROUP learning/coaching sessions contact me on:

cobbep@gmail.com

or

via  my Linked In Profile

View Peter Cobbe's profile on LinkedIn

RULES OF LIFE

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

Cherie Carter-Scott’s rules of life – an interesting perspective

Dr. Cherie Carter-Scott achieved her PhD in human and organisational development and for the nearly 30 years has been an international lecturer, consultant and author.

Carter-Scott’sook ‘If Life Is A Game, These Are The Rules’ is essential reading if you are interested in behaviour, relationships, communications, and human personality.

Cherie Carter-Scott’s rules for life – also known as ‘The Ten Rules For Being Human’ and referenced in her book  with Jack Canfield: ‘Chicken Soup For The Soul’ – are a map for understanding and pursuing personal development, and for helping others to understand and develop too.

‘If Life Is A Game, These Are The Rules’ is also commonly referenced book in the life-coaching industry.

Here is a brief summary and explanation of Cherie Carter-Scott’s ‘rules of life’.

(Carter Scott references this quotation:) 

“Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood.” (Helen Keller)

Rule One – You will receive a body.

Whether you love it or hate it, it’s yours for life, so accept it. What counts is what’s inside.

Rule Two – You will be presented with lessons.

Life is a constant learning experience, which every day provides opportunities for you to learn more. These lessons specific to you, and learning them ‘is the key to discovering and fulfilling the meaning and relevance of your own life’.

Rule Three – There are no mistakes, only lessons.

Your development towards wisdom is a process of experimentation, trial and error, so it’s inevitable things will not always go to plan or turn out how you’d want. Compassion is the remedy for harsh judgement – of ourselves and others. Forgiveness is not only divine – it’s also ‘the act of erasing an emotional debt’. Behaving ethically, with integrity, and with humour – especially the ability to laugh at yourself and your own mishaps – are central to the perspective that ‘mistakes’ are simply lessons we must learn.

Rule Four – The lesson is repeated until learned

Lessons repeat until learned. What manifest as problems and challenges, irritations and frustrations are more lessons – they will repeat until you see them as such and learn from them. Your own awareness and your ability to change are requisites of executing this rule. Also fundamental is the acceptance that you are not a victim of fate or circumstance – ‘causality’ must be acknowledged;that is to say: things happen to you because of how you are and what you do.

To blame anyone or anything else for your misfortunes is an escape and a denial;you yourself are responsible for you, and what happens to you. Patience is required – change doesn’t happen overnight, so give change time to happen.

Rule Five – Learning does not end.

While you are alive there are always lessons to be learned. Surrender to the ‘rhythm of life’, don’t struggle against it. Commit to the process of constant learning and change – be humble enough to always acknowledge your own weaknesses, and be flexible enough to adapt from what you may be accustomed to, because rigidity will deny you the freedom of new possibilities.

Rule Six – “There” is no better than “here”.

The other side of the hill may be greener than your own,but being there is not the key to endless happiness. Be grateful for and enjoy what you have, and where you are on your journey. Appreciate the abundance of what’s good in your life,rather than measure and amass things that do not actually lead to happiness. Living in the present helps you attain peace.

Rule Seven – Others are only mirrors of you.

You love or hate something about another person according to what love or hate about yourself. Be tolerant; accept others as they are, and strive for clarity of self-awareness;strive to truly understand and have an objective perception of your own self, your thoughts and feelings.Negative experiences are opportunities to heal the wounds that you carry. Support others, and by doing so you support yourself. Where you are unable to support others it is a sign that you are not adequately attending to your own needs.

Rule Eight – What you make of your life is up to you.

You have all the tools and resources you need.

What you do with them is up to you. Take responsibility for yourself. Learn to let go when you cannot change things.

Don’t get angry about things – bitter memories clutter your mind. Courage resides in all of us – use it when you need to do what’s right for you. We all possess a strong natural power and adventurous spirit, which you should draw on to embrace what lies ahead.

Rule Nine – Your answers lie inside of you.

Trust your instincts and your innermost feelings, whether you hear them as a little voice or a flash of inspiration. Listen to feelings as well as sounds. Look, listen, and trust. Draw on your natural inspiration.

Rule Ten – You will forget all this at birth.

We are all born with all of these capabilities – our early experiences lead us into a physical world, away from our spiritual selves, so that we become doubtful, cynical and lacking belief and confidence.

The Ten Rules are not meant to be commandments; they are universal truths that apply to us all. 

Aspire to be wise – wisdom the ultimate path of your life, and it knows no limits other than those you impose on yourself.

Click here for : BOOKS BY CHERIE CARTER-SCOTT

39519-treephilosophy

THE GROW COACHING MODEL

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

 The GROW Model 

The GROW acronym suggests that a coach using the GROW model is likely to start by asking the client to set goals, both for what they want to get out of the coaching sessions as a whole and for each individual session.

It is described in a number of coaching books, including John Whitmore’s excellent
book “Performance Coaching”.

Using the GROW Model, the coach will begin the discussion by asking the client to define the topic in order to understand what specifically the client wants to talk about, the scale of the challenges they face, the importance and emotional significance of the topic to the client and the client’s long-term vision or goal.

Most coaches will encourage clients to set goals which are SMART (Specific, Measurable, Agreed, Realistic and Time-framed) the idea being that this will assist the client in focusing their thoughts and will also enable them to measure whether they achieve what they are aiming for in the long-term.

In the ‘Reality’ stage of the GROW Model the coach will assist the client in assessing objectively where they currently are in relation to their goal and how they feel about their current situation. This process of discovery is designed to allow the help the client clarify their goals better and as they begin to understand them more deeply what is driving them and what their sources of dissatisfaction are. In summary both coach and client encourage self-assessment and offer explicit examples to demonstrate their points and paint the most accurate picture of the topic as possible.

In the ‘Options’ stage of the GROW Model the idea is not to find a solution immediately, but to generate as many alternative courses of action as possible. Once a number of options have been identified the next stage will be to decide which one the client wants to put into action to help move them towards their goals. In this final ‘Will’ stage of the GROW Model the coach/client relationship is moving from discussion to conclusion and achievement.

The coach’s ultimate aim is assist the client identify goals, options and actions for themselves, including:

* What the client is going to do
* When the client will do it
* Whether it will help them meet their goals
* What difficulties might be faced and how they may be dealt with
* Who the client will tell and what support they may try to get to help in their actions
* Overall the GROW Model provides a helpful practical framework to assist clients set goals and move towards them.

The GROW Model is deservedly one of the best known and widely used coaching
models.

It provides a simple yet powerful framework for navigating a route through
a coaching session, as well as providing a means of finding your way when lost.

See John Whitmore’s excellent
book “Performance Coaching”.

a09d4-dolphinweb

ELEVATOR PITCH INSIGHTS

Developing a powerful elevator pitch (or pitches)

a09d4-dolphinweb

Most people confuse elevator pitches with sales pitches, but they’re completely different. A sales pitch is a formal presentation.

An elevator pitch is a natural transition that takes place within a casual conversation

 THREE PARTS

Your elevator pitch has greater impact if it consists of three main parts:

  • The Benefit. That’s the reason the customer/client might want what you’re selling.
  • The Differentiator. Becomes the reason the customer/client might want to use your services.
  • The Ask.That’s where you ask for a further meeting or next step- if the customer/client shows interest.

Each element in detail.

  1. The Benefit

The benefit is never the product that you’re selling. It’s always the effect (“impact”) that your proposition or product could have on the customer’s/clients own business needs.

The benefit must something specifically and directly relevant to the clients business, ideally with a financial metric.

FOR EXAMPLE

WRONG:

  • “I sell inventory systems.” (That’s not product, not the benefit.)
  • “I sell inventory control systems that save you money.” (Benefit not specific.)

RIGHT:

  • “Manufacturers use my system to reduce their inventory costs by 50%.”
  • “Companies hire me to streamline their inventory, saving on average a million euros.”
  1. The Differentiator

 

This is what makes you different from everyone else. If there’s no differentiator, you’re selling your industry, not your product.  There is no particular reason to buy from YOU.

Strong differentiators contain a fact that is concrete and independently measurable rather than unsubstantiated claims and opinions.

They should NEVER refer to your emotions, which are irrelevant to the customer.

 

FOR EXAMPLE

WRONG:

  • “I am industry-leading and best-in-class.” (According to whom?)
  • “I can save you money faster than the competition. (Says who?)
  • “I am excited about providing you with best service!” (Who cares?)

RIGHT:

  • “I have a patented method that delivers materials the day they’re needed.”
  • “My system holds the industry record for the most money saved.”
  1. The Ask

 

The worst mistake you can make in an elevator pitch is trying to close the sale or reach instant engagement.  It is too soon for that. At this point, all you want is that first but all-important fact-finding meeting, where you can assess the clients needs and mutually decide whether you can meet those needs.

.

WRONG:

  • “Here’s my card. Give me a call if you’re interested.” (Failing to ask.)
  • “I can send you a price quote/proposition.” (Closing too soon.)

RIGHT:

  • “Since you’re interested, what’s the best way to move this forward?”

If you’ve got a strong enough benefit, and if your differentiator makes sense, you’ll probably get the meeting or progress to the next stage.

With practice, your elevator pitch can win you new clients wherever and whenever you might meet them

Example and Final Pointers to work on

 

Now, let’s pull it all together.  You want to leave a lasting impression

  • Keep it conversational. You want to sound like a colleague or a consultant.
  • Keep it simple. Avoid fancy words and technical jargon that might confuse the client.

Your value components relevant to the role needs and evidence of them making a difference

Component Role needs Your value
Your benefits
Your differentiator
Your ask
  1. OTHER INSIGHTS
  • Keep the pitch succinct and clear, with as few words as possible.
  • The pitch should be easily understood by a layman, rather than filled with acronyms and industry terminology.
  • What problem does your business solve, and what can you do for your target audience?
  • Spell out what makes you qualified to do what you do, without using buzzwords like “outside the box” or “synergy.” Using credibility-driven words like “certified” will help sell you.
  • Keep your pitch broad; don’t go into too many details.
  • The pitch should be tangible and easily grasped by your audience.
  • Each target audience is different. The pitch should be tailored to the listeners.
  • No matter how many versions of your pitch you have, they should all convey the same basic message.
  • Start the conversation, and gradually hook your target..

Put yourself in the position of the listener. Shape the value message as a solution to a problem, and keep away from jargon. Talk about how you offer a solution to the problem without getting into detailed mechanics of how it works, or why it’s better than the competition. Don’t tie up every loose end — leave openings for questions.

Several examples:

“I work with people who are struggling to sell their products or services into large corporate accounts.”

“I help small businesses win big contracts with large corporate customers.”

“I help technology companies who struggle launching important new products into the market and want to improve their time-to-profitability.”

 

39519-treephilosophy

Essential Elements of a Powerful Elevator Pitch

 

  • Your pitch should take no longer than 30-60 seconds.
  • Clear. Use language that everyone understands. Don’t use fancy words thinking it will make you sound smarter. Your listener won’t understand you and you’ll have lost your opportunity to hook them.
  • Use words that are powerful and strong.
  • Use words that create a visual image in your listeners mind. This will make your message memorable.
  • Tell a Story. A short story, that is. A good story is essentially this: someone with a problem either finds a solution or faces tragedy. Either type of story can be used to illuminate what you do.
  • A great elevator pitch is aimed for a specific audience. If you have target audiences that are vastly different, you might want to have a unique pitch for each.
  • Goal Oriented. A powerful elevator pitch is designed with a specific outcome in mind. What is your desired outcome? You may have different pitches depending on different objectives. For instance do you want to: make a sale, gain a prospect, enlist support for an idea, or earn a referral.
  • Has a Hook. This is the element that literally snags your listener’s interest and makes them want to know more.  This is the phrase or words that strike a chord in your listener.

AC_Logo_Main_LOW_

PETER COBBE – NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching and Consulting  via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetings

cobbep@gmail.com

My career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”

Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching

Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
Communications strategy

Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
First 100 days
Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
Coaching for powerful presentations
Life Coaching
Executive advice on staff insight surveys
Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices

Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
Confidence&Self Esteem
Creativity coaching
Independent Consulting propositions coaching
Non Executive director coaching
Business Report/White Paper writing
Graduate career coaching
Just a thought :

Five frogs are sitting on a log.
Four decide to jump off. How many are left?

Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.

Mark Feldman

boat6-high

PORTFOLIO CAREER INSIGHTS

Emotional-Intelligence1

Typical definitions of the portfolio approach include :

1. A portfolio career is the pursuit of more than one income source simultaneously, usually by applying the various skills you’ve developed throughout your career to different types of work. For example, you could combine consulting with part-time work, teaching at a local college and freelance writing. You could use your speaking and facilitation skills to lead workshops at companies or educational institutions. You could even develop your own product or service.

2. A Portfolio lifestyle involves a balanced lifestyle including earning your income from a variety of sources. For example, you might work on freelance contracts or as a part-time employee for several organisations, and perhaps also run a business.

  • In this way of working income is gained from several sources
  • It is popular with those who have specific skills that are in demand by different organisations.
  • At different times you might combine self-employment with, for example, short-term contracts or part-time, temporary or project work.
  • Each job adds skills and experience to your portfolio.
  • This type of work allows flexibility and can also be secure.
  • A balance can be struck between paid and unpaid work and an improved lifestyle

Working with several clients I have noticed that some attributes or qualities help to underpin success  including :

  • some risk tolerance and courage,
  • high self motivation and resilience ,
  • adequate personal finances
  • curious an interested in continuous personal development ,
  • good interpersonal , self marketing and networking skills,
  • seeking appropriate support from others
  • willingness to take on new challenges and
  • able to multi task.

Join the associated Linked In Group

Read the Free Portfolio Lifestyle magazine on FLIPBOARD

For coaching on all dimensions of developing and achieving a portfolio career/lifestyle contact me :
Peter Cobbe Coaching

This is the secret – the repertoire. You have to try to consolidate your repertoire. It is a big step if you know how to do that.  Cecilia Bartoli

A portfolio approach implies an ongoing , flexible and evolving journey. The components of your portfolio can change and evolve. Consolidation, nurturing,sustaining and developing become essential drivers

Some components can be removed if they are not meeting your needs or criteria.

New components can be added as you learn more and discover new possibilities.

In this sense it is worth reviewing and evaluating progress at key stages to see what needs to change as well as being constantly curious and actively researching new possibilities.

When considering a portfolio approach it can be useful to refer to Stephen Coveys thinking about effective people since it provides useful insights :

SEVEN HABITS OF EFFECTIVE PEOPLE by Stephen Covey

The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective Peo…

Stephen R. Covey

Best Price £3.00

or Buy New £7.69

Each chapter is dedicated to one of the habits, which are represented by the following imperatives:

The First Three Habits surround moving from dependence to independence (i.e. self mastery)

  • Habit 1: Be Proactive

Synopsis: Take initiative in life by realising your decisions (and how they align with life’s principles) are the primary determining factor for effectiveness in your life. Taking responsibility for your choices and the subsequent consequences that follow.

  • Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind

Synopsis: Self-discover and clarify your deeply important character values and life goals. Envisioning the ideal characteristics for each of your various roles and relationships in life.

  • Habit 3: Put First Things First

Synopsis: Planning, prioritising, and executing your week’s tasks based on importance rather than urgency. Evaluating if your efforts exemplify your desired character values, propel you towards goals, and enrich the roles and relationships elaborated in Habit 2.

 

The Next Three are to do with Interdependence (i.e. working with others)

  • Habit 4: Think Win-Win

Synopsis: Genuinely striving for mutually beneficial solutions or agreements in your relationships. Valuing and respecting people by understanding a “win” for all is ultimately a better long-term resolution than if only one person in the situation had gotten his way.

  • Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, then to be Understood

Synopsis: Using empathetic listening to be genuinely influenced by a person, which compels them to reciprocate the listening, take an open mind to being influenced by you, which creates an atmosphere of caring, respect, and positive problem solving.

  • Habit 6: Synergise

Synopsis: Combining the strengths of people through positive teamwork, so as to achieve goals no one person could have done alone. How to yield the most prolific performance out of a group of people through encouraging meaningful contribution, and modeling inspirational and supportive leadership.

 

The Last habit relates to self-rejuvenation;

  • Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw

Synopsis: The balancing and renewal of your resources, energy, and health to create a sustainable long-term effective lifestyle.

FOR DETAILED INFORMATION AND INSIGHTS ON ESTABLISHING A PORTFOLIO CAREER /LIFESTYLE

SAM_1835

The DANCE MODEL for thinking

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Systematic approaches to thinking more clearly

 

Having a systematic step-by-step process for thinking about certain tasks can be particularly useful so that everything is done as efficiently as possible.

For example, the DANCE system is one of many tools for solving problems.

D – Define and clarify what the problem really is (sometimes it is not initially clear). What are your goals?

A – Think of a range of alternative ways of solving the problem.

N – Narrow down the range of possible solutions to leave the best.

C – Choose the ideal solution and check what the consequences might be.

E – Effect action using the best solution.

Here is a checklist to use when making judgments about things that you hear, see and experience.

  • Who is speaking or writing?
  • What is their point of view or perspective?
  • What ideas and information are presented and how were they obtained?
  • Are there unsupported assertions?
  • Are reasons or evidence provided?
  • Are the reasons and evidence given relevant?
  • Is the method used to find the evidence sound?
  • Is the evidence correct or valid?
  • What assumptions have been made?
  • What is fact and what is opinion?
  • What are the implicit and explicit values?
  • Are there unreasonable generalisations?
  • What has been omitted?
  • How was the conclusion reached?
  • Is the conclusion reasonable?
  • What other perspectives or points of view could there be?

IMG_4817

Peter Cobbe coaching

AC_Logo_Main_LOW_

For a  free exploratory discussion contact me –  cobbep@gmail.com

NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetings

My career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”

Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
First 100 days
Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
Coaching for powerful presentations
Life Coaching
Executive advice on staff insight surveys
Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
Communications strategy
Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
Confidence&Self Esteem
Creativity coaching
Independent Consulting propositions coaching
Non Executive director coaching
Business Report/White Paper writing
Graduate career coaching

IMG_1573

IMG_0017

IMPROVING THINKING SKILLS AND ABILITY

a09d4-dolphinweb

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.  Albert Einstein

When working with clients it often emerges that the quality of their thinking is causing blocks to desired progress. Our focus then switches to better understanding how the client processes information and makes decisions to help move forward.

A THINKING LEVELS PERSPECTIVE

Common to all subjects and levels is the concept of higher and lower order thinking skills. Higher order skills are considered to be more complex than lower order skills. The triangle model provides a useful way to visualise the relationships between some of the key skills. The complexity of the skills increases from the base to the top of the list below

Although the skills are arranged in a hierarchical way, they are all important. Much of the thinking we do involves a mixture of skills at different levels. We develop and use them simultaneously, for example, when we are solving problems and analysing case studies.

It is possible to extend and develop higher order thinking skills – to develop thinking at a qualitatively higher level, to move into a higher gear.

The specific skills in each area are shown in this list  here:

Evaluate           judge, appraise, choose, rate, assess, estimate, value, measure, criticise

Synthesise      formulate, teach, design, develop, re-define, propose, create

Analyse           distinguish, differentiate, calculate, debate, relate, compare, experiment, contrast, examine

Apply             demonstrate, schedule, operate, sketch, employ, use, practice

Comprehend  restate, identify, discuss, locate, recognise, review, explain, tell, clarify

Know             recall, define, state, list, repeat, name, recount, present, find

2. REVIEWING SOME ASPECTS OF YOUR THINKING

 

Activity 1 Complete a simple audit covering the ways you think

Personal statements Always Sometimes Never
I see myself as open and fair minded.
I am curious to find out about things.
I am really interested in a specific subject
I relate ideas to previous knowledge, experience and wider contexts
I look for patterns and relationships between things.
I like to ask questions and not accept things at face value
I don’t rush to make judgements or have opinions on things.
I like to look at all sides of an argument or issues before coming to a conclusion
I am persistent and like to get to the bottom of things.
I don’t like situations where people just state opinions without giving reasons or evidence
I like to find things out for myself and come to my own conclusions on things
I like to be creative and innovative.
I take time to reflect on things/my own thinking
I like clarity, order and precision
I think strategically about things
Any statement you wish to add
Any statement you wish to add

Activity 2 Use the table again to map where you would like to be and consider the gapsand then reflect on any learning gained using the table below

Reflection – what I have noticed? Action – what I will do?
What have you learned in terms of potential limitations?Do the limitations matter right now in your life?/if so consider next step actions……
What have you noticed in terms of strengths?Do you want to develop these strengths further?Consider what you might do to achieve this

 

The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. A person cannot help but be in awe when they contemplate the mystery of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one merely tries to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.

(Albert Einstein)

  1. Questions to develop skills at different levels of thinking
LEVEL OF THINKING EXAMPLES OF QUESTIONS
Knowledge and understanding What? Who? When?What is an example of x?What is meant by …..?

What is another way of explaining..?

Is this an example of …?

Can I describe x in my own words?

Application How is it used?What does it relate to?In what situations …?
Analysis Why? How?What is the reason for ….. ?What evidence is there to support the conclusion?

What are the causes of …?

How do … fit together?

Synthesis If x happens, then what next?What does the theory predict will happen?What are my own conclusions on the basis of the information available?

How does x relate to y?

Evaluation Is this good or not and why?Is this reasonable or not and why?
  1. GIVING STRUCTURE TO THINKING

 

Two common thinking problems are: a feeling of not being able to ‘see the wood for the trees’, and difficulty in being logical and orderly. The key to solving them is being able to think about ideas and information in a conceptual and systematic way so that you have ways to structure your thinking.

This can involve:

  • looking at the broader context
  • developing mental models and frameworks to hang ideas and information on
  • Being able to distinguish relative importance and seeing patterns and relationships.

Other ways might be based on:

  • chronology,
  • complexity,
  • spatial organisation,
  • positive and negative aspects,
  • pros and cons,
  • familiar and unfamiliar,
  • from top to bottom of an organisational structure.

In some cases, the component parts of something work together to form a system, for example arteries, veins and capillaries work together to form the blood circulatory system in the body.

  1. USEFUL THINKING MODELS

 

USING DANCE

 

For example, the DANCE system (Rose and Nicholl, 1997) is one of many tools for solving problems.

D – Define and clarify what the problem really is (sometimes it is not initially clear). What are your goals?

A – Think of a range of alternative ways of solving the problem.

N – Narrow down the range of possible solutions to leave the best.

C – Choose the ideal solution and check what the consequences might be.

E – Effect action using the best solution.

 

 

 

USING VISUAL TOOLS

 

Organising thought can be assisted greatly by the use of visual tools.

These can include:

  • diagrams,
  • mind-maps,
  • tables,
  • graphs, time lines,
  • flow charts,
  • sequence diagrams,
  • decision trees
  • story boards
  • rich pictures
  • or other visual representations.

The process of making visual representations can itself involve using and developing a range of thinking skills, particularly higher order skills. So, whether you need the resulting product or not they can be worth doing. However, the resulting product can also provide an effective way of communicating your thinking to others. In fact, sometimes it can be very hard not to use a diagram – drawing or referring to a map, for example, makes it much easier to give directions.

Mind-mapping can be a particularly powerful visual tool for shaping thought. The basic principle here is to note down the central topic or idea in the centre of a piece of paper and work outwards adding the points which flow from and connect to it. It is particularly helpful for seeing the different

levels of thought.  Here is a mind map example by someone planning to write an essay on memory.

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

 .At this stage, you may find it useful to consider how ideas like these can be put together in ways that will help you when you engage in activities such as reading, writing, speaking and listening.

Here is a checklist to use when making judgements about things that you hear, see and experience.

  • Who is speaking or writing?
  • What is their point of view or perspective?
  • What ideas and information are presented and how were they obtained?
  • Are there unsupported assertions?
  • Are reasons or evidence provided?
  • Are the reasons and evidence given relevant?
  • Is the method used to find the evidence sound?
  • Is the evidence correct or valid?
  • What assumptions have been made?
  • What is fact and what is opinion?
  • What are the implicit and explicit values?
  • Are there unreasonable generalisations?
  • What has been omitted?
  • How was the conclusion reached?
  • Is the conclusion reasonable?
  • What other perspectives or points of view could there be?
  • You may be able to think of more points to add to this list.

 IMG_4817

RESOURCES -more insights

Listening Skills

Empathy

Thinking Errors

Thinking Skills

We Are Our Thoughts

9 Mind blowing epiphanies

Critical Thinking – check your style and reasoning

10 Things To Stop Doing Now

Developing Resilience

SEE MORE ON IMPROVED THINKING IN MY FLIPBOARD MAGAZINE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT : OPEN UNIVERSITY- OPEN LEARNING- DEVELOPING THINKING SKILLS

CRITICAL THINKING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM – Scientific American

IMG_1573 Peter Cobbe Coaching

  • NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetingsMy career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
    I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
    Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
    Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
    First 100 days
    Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
    Coaching for powerful presentations
    Life Coaching
    Executive advice on staff insight surveys
    Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
    Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
    Communications strategy
    Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
    Confidence&Self Esteem
    Creativity coaching
    Independent Consulting propositions coaching
    Non Executive director coaching
    Business Report/White Paper writing
    Graduate career coaching

Just a thought :

Five frogs are sitting on a log.
Four decide to jump off. How many are left? 

Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.

Mark Feldman

For a free exploratory discussion on 1 to 1 or Group Session coaching contact me on:

cobbep@gmail.com

or

via  my Linked In Profile

Blake Mouton Leadership Model

IMG_4817

Some leaders are very task-oriented; they simply want to get things done.

Others are very people-oriented; they want people to be happy.

And others are a combination of the two.

If you prefer to lead by setting and enforcing tight schedules, you tend to be more production-oriented (or task-oriented). If you make people your priority and try to accommodate employee needs, then you’re more people-oriented.

Neither preference is right or wrong, just as no one type of leadership style is best for all situations. However, it’s useful to understand what your natural leadership tendencies are, so that you can then working on developing skills that you may be missing.

 

A popular framework for thinking about a leader’s ‘task versus person’ orientation was developed by Robert Blake and Jane Mouton in the early 1960s. Called the Managerial Grid, or Leadership Grid, it plots the degree of task-centeredness versus person-centeredness and identifies five combinations as distinct leadership styles.

Understanding the Model The Managerial Grid is based on two behavioral dimensions:

* Concern for People This is the degree to which a leader considers the needs of team members, their interests, and areas of personal development when deciding how best to accomplish a task

* Concern for Production – This is the degree to which a leader emphasizes concrete objectives, organizational efficiency and high productivity when deciding how best to accomplish a task.

Using the axis to plot leadership ‘concerns for production’ versus ‘concerns for people’, Blake and Mouton defined the following five leadership styles:

Country Club Leadership – High People/Low Production This style of leader is most concerned about the needs and feelings of members of his/her team. These people operate under the assumption that as long as team members are happy and secure then they will work hard. What tends to result is a work environment that is very relaxed and fun but where production suffers due to lack of direction and control.

Produce or Perish Leadership – High Production/Low People Also known as Authoritarian or Compliance Leaders, people in this category believe that employees are simply a means to an end. Employee needs are always secondary to the need for efficient and productive workplaces. This type of leader is very autocratic, has strict work rules, policies, and procedures, and views punishment as the most effective means to motivate employees.

Impoverished Leadership – Low Production/Low People This leader is mostly ineffective. He/she has neither a high regard for creating systems for getting the job done, nor for creating a work environment that is satisfying and motivating. The result is a place of disorganization, dissatisfaction and disharmony.

Middle-of-the-Road Leadership – Medium Production/Medium People This style seems to be a balance of the two competing concerns. It may at first appear to be an ideal compromise. Therein lies the problem, though: When you compromise, you necessarily give away a bit of each concern so that neither production nor people needs are fully met. Leaders who use this style settle for average results and often believe that this is the most anyone can expect.

Team Leadership – High Production/High People According to the Blake Mouton model, this is the pinnacle of managerial style. These leaders stress production needs and the needs of the people equally highly. The premise here is that employees are involved in understanding organizational purpose and determining production needs. When employees are committed to, and have a stake in the organization’s success, their needs and production needs coincide.

This creates a team environment based on trust and respect, which leads to high satisfaction and motivation and, as a result, high production.

Applying the Blake Mouton Managerial Grid Being aware of the various approaches is the first step in understanding and improving how well you perform as a manager. It is important to understand how you currently operate, so that you can then identify ways of becoming competent in both realms.

Step One: Identify your leadership style.

* Think of some recent situations where you were the leader.

* For each of these situations, place yourself in the grid according to where you believe you fit.

Step Two: Identify areas of improvement and develop your leadership skills

* Look at your current leadership method and critically analyze its effectiveness.

* Look at ways you can improve. Are you settling for ‘middle of the road’ because it is easier than reaching for more?

* Identify ways to get the skills you need to reach the Team Leadership position. These may include involving others in problem solving or improving how you communicate with them, if you feel you are too task-oriented. Or it may mean becoming clearer about scheduling or monitoring project progress if you tend to focus too much on people.

* Continually monitor the way you work and watch for situations when you slip back into unhelpful habits. Step Three: Put the Grid in Context It is important to recognize that the Team Leadership style isn’t always the most effective approach in every situation. While the benefits of democratic and participative management are universally accepted, there are times that call for more attention in one area than another.

If your company is in the midst of a merger or some other significant change, it is often acceptable to place a higher emphasis on people than on production. Likewise, when faced with an economic hardship or physical risk, people concerns may be placed on the back burner, for the short-term at least, to achieve high productivity and efficiency.

Note: Theories of leadership have moved on a certain amount since the Blake Mouton Grid was originally proposed. In particular, the context in which leadership occurs is seen as an important driver of the leadership style used. And in many situations, the “Team Leader” as an ideal has moved to the ideal of the “Transformational Leader”:

Someone who, according to leadership researcher Bernard Bass:

* Is a model of integrity and fairness;

* Sets clear goals;

* Has high expectations;

* Encourages;

* Provides support and recognition;

* Stirs people’s emotions;

* Gets people to look beyond their self-interest; and

* Inspires people to reach for the improbable.

SUMMARY

The Blake Mouton Managerial Grid is a practical and useful framework that helps you think about your leadership style.

By plotting ‘concern for production’ against ‘concern for people’, the grid highlights how placing too much emphasis in one area at the expense of the other leads to low overall productivity.

The model proposes that when both people and production concerns are high, employee engagement and productivity increases accordingly. This is often true, and it follows the ideas of Theories X and Y, and other participative management theories.

While the grid does not entirely address the complexity of “Which leadership style is best?”, it certainly provides an excellent starting place to critically analyze your skills and improve your general leadership skills.

See also the LEADERSHIP AGILITY model

I provide excellent leadership coaching for managers and senior executives aiming to develop new levels of impact and enjoyment in their role . See my proposition and details here : Peter Cobbe Coaching

The approach is based on careful diagnostics and then a customised programme to suit very specific individual needs and current work challenges . The end result is evolution in leadership style and impact.

RIVER%2520CRUISE%2520SECOND%2520LOT%25202011%2520080