Monthly Archives: September 2014

SWOT ANALYSIS INSIGHTS and free ebook

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SWOT analysis  is a strategic planning method used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses/Limitations, Opportunities, and Threats involved in an intended strategy,project or in a business venture.

It involves specifying the objective of the business venture or project and identifying the internal and external factors that are favorable and unfavorable to achieve that objective. The technique is credited to Albert Humphrey, who presided a convention at Stanford University in the 1960s and 1970s using data from Fortune 500 companies.
Setting the objective should be done after the SWOT analysis has been performed. This would allow achievable goals or objectives to be set for the organisation.
▪Strengths: characteristics of the business, or project team that give it an advantage over others
▪Weaknesses (or Limitations): are characteristics that place the team at a disadvantage relative to others
▪Opportunities: external chances to improve performance (e.g. make greater profits) in the environment
▪Threats: external elements in the environment that could cause trouble for the business or project
Identification of SWOTs is essential because subsequent steps in the process of planning for achievement of the selected objective may be derived from the SWOTs.
First, the decision makers have to determine whether the objective is attainable, given the SWOTs. If the objective is NOT attainable a different objective must be selected and the process repeated.
Users of SWOT analysis need to ask and answer questions that generate meaningful information for each category (strengths, opportunities, weaknesses, and threats) in order to maximise the benefits of this evaluation and find their competitive advantage.

Matching and converting
One way of using SWOT is matching and converting. Matching is used to find competitive advantages by matching the strengths to opportunities. Converting is to apply conversion strategies to convert weaknesses or threats into strengths or opportunities. An example of conversion strategy is to find new markets. If the threats or weaknesses cannot be converted a company should try to minimise or avoid them.

Use of SWOT analysis
The usefulness of SWOT analysis is not limited to profit-seeking organisations. SWOT analysis may be used in any decision-making situation when a desired end-state (objective) has been defined. Examples include: non-profit organisations, government units, and individuals. SWOT analysis may also be used in pre-crisis planning and preventive crisis management. SWOT analysis may also be used in creating a recommendation during a viability study/survey.

FREE  pdf EBOOK on SWOT ANALYSIS

 MORE ON STRATEGY – BUILDING A BRAND

SWOT

Peter Cobbe coaching

For a  free exploratory discussion contact me –  cobbep@gmail.com

NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetings

My career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”

Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
First 100 days
Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
Coaching for powerful presentations
Life Coaching
Executive advice on staff insight surveys
Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
Communications strategy
Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
Confidence&Self Esteem
Creativity coaching
Independent Consulting propositions coaching
Non Executive director coaching
Business Report/White Paper writing
Graduate career coaching

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Insights on Establishing Credibility

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Our character…is an omen of our destiny, and the more integrity we have and keep, the simpler and nobler that destiny is likely to be. George Santayana (1863 – 1952),

 

ALSO SEE DEVELOPING RESILIENCE

Insights on establishing Credibility

Unlike height or weight, your measure of credibility isn’t an objective measure. It is not something you either have or you don’t.
Credibility is more like a linear scale on which others give you a rating. It is a perceived quality, one that people assign to you based on the complex interplay of a number of elements.
Identifying the elements of credibility is important because a high score on one or two elements does not guarantee a high credibility rating. It’s the interplay that matters. For example, experts are usually considered highly credible, unless or until they are perceived as biased or self-serving. Lack of integrity can cancel out the positive impact of expertise.
It is worth considering five elements of credibility and to examine your impact in light of these elements. Give yourself a score between one and ten on each of these elements based on how you think others perceive you—

1. Integrity,
2. Competence,
3. Sound judgment,
4. Relational sensitivity,
5. Likeability

Aim to rate yourself on what others can observe rather than on what you intend. Once you see your strengths and weakness, you can take positive steps to boost your credibility in the eyes of others.


Credibility Element 1: Integrity

A key element of credibility involves transparency, trustworthiness, and moral predictability. We feel good about people who embody the phrase, “what you see is what you get.”
The dictionary definition of credibility is the power to inspire belief. For example, a credible witness is one whom we have reason to believe. Credibility implies a commitment to truth, fairness, and objectivity. In addition, we assign high credibility to people who have clear moral standards and who are known to stick to them.
Be careful not to underestimate the importance of honesty and integrity in the workplace. People who have a track record of being objective and truthful are perceived as more credible than those who don’t. . Conclusions based on scientific or systematic inquiry are more credible than those based on subjective judgments.

According to researchers Kouzes and Posner, the number one trait people are looking for in a leader is honesty. We know from experience that one failure to disclose an important truth can ruin an entire career.

To boost your credibility on this element, consider the following:

• Invest time in clarifying your values and examining your behaviour in light of them
• Make a commitment to consistently tell the truth
• Build a reputation for ethical behaviour
• If you make a mistake, be truthful about it rather than cover it up
• Give credit to colleagues and subordinates for their work
• When you change your stance on a position, do so for objective rather than political reasons


Credibility Element 2: Competence

Experts enjoy a much higher degree of credibility than those who lack expertise. As society’s knowledge expands, we rely more and more on people who can demonstrate deep expertise, often with a narrow focus. We trust experts to understand the scope of an issue or project, to know the right questions to ask, and to know how to find the answers to those questions. In today’s world, there is no credibility without expertise.

Perceived expertise comes from a blend of a person’s education and experience. People with doctoral degrees in a field obviously have more credibility than those who lack a degree. At the same time, people who have “come up through the ranks” or have worked in diverse jobs within an industry are considered to be experts. These folks usually have more perceived expertise than new college graduates.

Expertise turns into competence when it is put to the test. A person earns her/his credibility as competent by succeeding at assignments and projects over time. A track record of successfully applying knowledge and a willingness to continue learning increases perceived credibility.

To boost your credibility on this element, take the following actions:

• If needed, complete your degree or consider the next degree
• Obtain a license to practice or a professional certification appropriate to your field
• Request high-visibility projects to establish a track record
• Ask to participate on task forces with key people in your organisation so they can see your competence firsthand
• Participate in meetings, asking probing questions and making insightful comments
• Attend conferences in your field and engage in continual learning

Credibility Element 3: Sound Judgment

Just as a good friend can be counted on to listen well and encourage you to make wise decisions, a credible person can be counted on to analyse complex situations, ask intelligent questions, and make good decisions. A person with sound judgment usually has both cognitive and intuitive gifts. This person takes a big-picture rather than a myopic view and a long-term rather than a short-term perspective.

An astute CEO, for example, might have a track record of acquiring businesses or creating products just ahead of demand. This person has a track record of correctly anticipating future trends and preparing for them.

To boost your credibility on this element, take the following actions:

• Consider the impact of your decisions on other departments and groups
• Ask others for input into your decisions—especially regarding the impact on them
• Avoid snap judgments
• Be willing to admit mistakes
• Read books and use other media to gain insights by management and relationship specialists
• Stay current on the trends within your industry and company

Credibility Element 4: Relationally Sensitive

People with high credibility know how to ask questions about our values and interests, to listen intently and with empathy, and to pull people together. These are the people with high emotional intelligence to balance the arrogance sometimes comes with high expertise.

A person develops a track record in relationships in the same way that they develop a track record in performance. If they become known for building commitment and cooperation, for being level-headed and fair, everyone will want them on their team.
Those who have the most perceived credibility are usually the ones who are relationally sensitive.

To boost your credibility on this element, take the following actions:

• Demonstrate willingness to learn from others and from your own mistakes
• Demonstrate concern for others’ values, goals, and objectives
• Cultivate the ability to listen well
• Take time to build relationships with informal conversations
• Don’t say something behind a person’s back that you wouldn’t say to their face
• Be generous with credit to colleagues and subordinates
• Take time to understand another’s point of view before refuting or rejecting it

Credibility Element 5: Likeable

Research studies consistently reveal that people respond positively to others whom they like. They trust them, they cooperate with them, they approve their proposals, and they buy from them. Likeability is as important as ability. Successful people balance expertise with likeability. It is a proven formula for success.
One view is that there are four ingredients to likeability:
1. Friendliness,
2. Relevance,
3. Empathy,
4. Realness.
Relevance and empathy are ingredients of relationship sensitivity as described above. Realness, or authenticity, links to integrity, the first element of credibility. Likeability is much more than a feel-good characteristic.

Emotional intelligence guru, Daniel Goleman, and co-authors Boyatzis and McKee, describe the importance of optimism and a lighthearted perspective in the workplace, asserting that leaders who have the ability to express enthusiasm and upbeat emotions attract other people. In their book, Primal Leadership, these researchers put it succinctly:

Research has proven it: Optimistic, enthusiastic leaders more easily retain their people, compared with those bosses who tend toward negative moods.

To boost your credibility on this element, take the following actions:

• Communicate optimistically by describing challenges rather than problems
• Focus on what can be done as opposed to what can’t be done
• Go out of your way to be friendly, even if you aren’t an extravert
• Practice finding the humour around you, especially in stressful situations
• Express gratitude privately, publicly and in writing
• Demonstrate an interest on matters of personal importance to others
• Congratulate others and celebrate their successes
• Credibility is a Package Deal

SUMMARY

No single element described here can guarantee high perceived credibility. After all, an expert without integrity might be a dictator. A likeable person who lacks judgment will make stupid decisions.

People assign you a degree of credibility based on how they rate you on the interaction of the elements of credibility: integrity, expertise, sound judgment, relationship sensitivity, and likeability. Perceived credibility is a package deal. Remember, too, that your credibility is based on observed behaviour, not on your intentions.


CREDIBILITY = Integrity + Competence+ Sound Judgement+ Relational Sensitivity + Likeability 

Other insights :

Being a Trusted Advisor

Insights on Influencing effectively

Listening Skills

Communication Style and Living by Example

Peter Cobbe coaching

  • NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS : Coaching via Skype / Facetime / 1 to 1 meetingsMy career experience includes HR Director and senior executive roles in Barclays plc and Tesco plc leading major transformation and complex change programmes reporting at Board level .I have an MBA, BA and I am a member of the CIPD and Association for Coaching. I am an accredited coach with over 12 years of private client coaching experience and as an associate consultant with Penna (UK) dealing with career, life,executive and business coaching and counselling. I work in mentoring and coaching partnerships with executives to help achieve gains of importance to them.I help people of all ages, different cultures and job levels to understand more about themselves, their impact on others and how to develop across major dimensions in life.
    I respect the integrity and confidentiality of my clients building on their existing great skills and abilities and evolving enhanced self guidance : ” No one in the world was ever you before, with your particular gifts and abilities and possibilities.”Specialties: Holistic / systemic approach to coaching
    Remote coaching via Skype and Apple Facetime
    Coaching for Executive performance /High Potential including C level
    First 100 days
    Career Coaching/portfolio lifestyle
    Coaching for powerful presentations
    Life Coaching
    Executive advice on staff insight surveys
    Facilitating key meetings and C- level strategic retreats engaging around people decisions that flow from business choices
    Business/HR Strategy ,Change Leadership
    Communications strategy
    Psychometrics,NLP,Emotional Intelligence
    Confidence&Self Esteem
    Creativity coaching
    Independent Consulting propositions coaching
    Non Executive director coaching
    Business Report/White Paper writing
    Graduate career coachingJust a thought :Five frogs are sitting on a log.
    Four decide to jump off. How many are left?

    Answer: five. Why? Because there’s a difference between deciding and doing.

    Mark Feldman

For a free exploratory discussion on 1 to 1 or Group Session coaching contact me on:

petercobbe@coachingcosmos.com

or

via  my Linked In Profile

My personal coaching website:

http://petercobbecoaching.coachingcosmos.com/

SIGNATURE PRESENCE and LEADERS

CLOUD LIGHT WEB

SIGNATURE PRESENCE : A study suggests that top leaders have 7 attributes that make them outstanding in their field.

They are…

  1. Technical Competence. This is  business literacy and a grasp of one’s field. If you don’t know the ins and outs of your business, you’re going to be at a serious disadvantage when facing the competition. Become an obsessive student of your business field until you know intimately how it works.
  2. Conceptual Skills. This is a faculty for abstract thinking. It includes what Jonathan Swift called“seeing the invisible” ie visualising where people can go and what they can achieve. Practise taking time out just to play with your thoughts of where you and your team can go.
  3. Track Record. This is a history of achieving results. Your track record enhances your credibility and therefore your authority. Don’t let any kind of achievement go by without recording it and using it to let people know you’re a person who gets results.
  4. People Skills. Of all the people skills that you need to have to get people working with you, the top 3 are the ability to communicate, motivate, and delegate.Make up your mind to develop these three skills until you are a master.
  5. Taste. The idea of “taste” is an intuitive sense of where talent lies. The great leaders are those who spot the potential right under their nose. When others just see people as resources on a balance sheet, successful leaders see them as potential to be developed. Get a taste for the talent in your team.
  6. Judgment. Few leaders today are able to operate in perfect conditions. More often than not, they have to take decisions in imperfect conditions. That’s when their judgment comes into play. When time is short, when the data is lacking, great leaders rely on intuition to get them through. Make that sixth sense your best friend.
  7. Character. Character means the qualities that define who you are. Not personality. Personality is your outward public face. But character is based on the values inside that matter more than anything else. Decide what yours are and how important they are to you.This establishes ” signature presence”

BOOKS ON LEADERSHIP EXCELLENCE

LEADERSHIP QUOTES

  1. “A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the quality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.” –Anonymous
  2. “No person can be a great leader unless he takes genuine joy in the successes of those under him.” –W. H. Auden
  3. “Good leaders make people feel that they’re at the very heart of things, not at the periphery. Everyone feels that he or she makes a difference to the success of the organization. When that happens people feel centered and that gives their work meaning.” –Warren Bennis
  4. “No man will make a great leader who wants to do it all himself, or to get all the credit for doing it.” — Andrew Carnegie
  5. “A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” –Rosalynn Carter
  6. “Perhaps the most central characteristic of authentic leadership is the relinquishing of the impulse to dominate others.” –David Cooper
  7. “The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality.” — Max DePree
  8. “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” –Dwight D. Eisenhower
  9. “A boss creates fear, a leader confidence. A boss fixes blame, a leader corrects mistakes. A boss knows all, a leader asks questions. A boss makes work drudgery, a leader makes it interesting. A boss is interested in himself or herself, a leader is interested in the group.” –Russell H. Ewing
  10. “Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions. ” — Harold Geneen
  11. “One of the true tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.” –Arnold Glasow
  12. “All of the great leaders have had one characteristic in common: it was the willingness to confront unequivocally the major anxiety of their people in their time. This, and not much else, is the essence of leadership. ” — John Kenneth Galbraith
  13. “The very essence of leadership is that you have to have vision. You can’t blow an uncertain trumpet.” –Theodore Hesburgh
  14. “The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men the conviction and the will to carry on… The genius of a good leader is to leave behind him a situation which common sense, without the grace of genius, can deal with successfully.” –Walter Lippmann
  15. “Leadership is getting someone to do what they don’t want to do, to achieve what they want to achieve.” –Tom Landry
  16. “Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.” –John Maxwell
  17. “The real leader has no need to lead– he is content to point the way.” — Henry Miller
  18. “The leader must know, most know that he knows, and must be able to make it abundantly clear to those about him that he knows.” –Clarence B. Randall
  19. “The person who know “how” will always have job. The person who knows “why” will always be his boss.” –Diane Ravitch
  20. “A true leader is hated by most, and respected by all. A follower is liked by all, and respected by none.” –Scott Smigler
  21. “Integrity is the most valuable and respected quality of leadership. Always keep your word.” –Brian Tracey
  22. “You know what makes leadership? It is the ability to get men to do what they don’t want to do and like it.” –Harry S. Truman
  23. “Leadership is not the private reserve of a few charismatic men and women. It is a process ordinary people use when they are bringing forth the best from themselves and others.” –Unknown
  24. “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day to day to lead himself.” –Thomas J. Watson
  25. “Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it’s amazing what they can accomplish.” –Sam Walton

The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership

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The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership by Dr John Maxwell, is an insightful book on the subject of leadership and growing your influence.

Each of the 21 irrefutable laws, relates to some specific principle that not only helps you become a better leader, someone others enjoy following, but if you put them into practice in your daily life, you will find they also help you to simply become a better individual.

Here is  a short overview of each of the 21 irrefutable laws of leadership using excerpts from the book.

 1. The Law of the lid. Your leadership is like a lid or a ceiling on your organization. Your church or business will not rise beyond the level your leadership allows. That’s why when a corporation or team needs to be fixed, they fire the leader.

2. The Law of Influence. Leadership is simply about influencing people. Nothing more, nothing less. The true test of a leader is to ask him to create positive change in an organization. If you cannot create change, you cannot lead. Being a leader is not about being first, or being an entrepreneur, or being the most knowledgeable, or being a manager. Being a leader is not just holding a leadership position.

 3. The Law of Process. Leadership is learned over time. And it can be learned. People skills, emotional strength, vision, momentum, and timing are all areas that can and should be learned. Leaders are always learners.

4. The Law of Navigation. Anyone can steer the ship, but it takes a leader to chart the course. Vision is defined as the ability to see the whole trip before leaving the dock. A leader will also see obstacles before others do. A leader sees more, sees farther, and sees before others. A navigator (leader) listens; he finds out about grassroots level reactions. Navigators balance optimism with realism. Preparation is the key to good navigation. It’s not the size of the project, it’s the size of the leader that counts.

5. The Law of E.F. Hutton. Hutton was America’s most influential stock market analyst. When he spoke, everyone listened. When real leaders speak, people automatically listen. Conversely, in any group or church, you can identify the real leaders by looking for those who people listen to.

6. The Law of Solid Ground. Trust is the foundation for all effective leadership. When it comes to leadership, there are no shortcuts. Building trust requires competence, connection and character.

7.The Law of Respect. People naturally follow people stronger than themselves. Even natural leaders tend to fall in behind those who they sense have a higher leadership quotient than themselves.

8. The Law of Intuition. Leaders evaluate everything with a Leadership bias. Leaders see trends, resources and problems, and can read people.

9. The Law of Magnetism. Leaders attract people like themselves. Who you are is who you attract. Work to attract leaders rather than followers if you want to build a truly strong organization.

10. The Law of Connection. You must touch the heart before you ask people to follow. Communicate on the level of emotion first to make a personal connection.

11. The Law of the Inner Circle. A leader’s potential is determined by those closest to him. “The leader finds greatness in the group, and helps the members find it in themselves”.

12. The Law of Empowerment. Only secure leaders give power to others. Mark Twain said, Great things can happen when you don’t care who gets the credit. Another point to ponder – Great leaders gain authority by giving it away.

13. The Law of Reproduction. It takes a leader to raise up a leader. Followers can’t do it, and neither can institutional programs It takes one to know one, to show one, to grow one. The potential of an organization depends on the growth of its leadership.

14. The Law of Buy-In. People buy in to the leader first, then the vision. If they don’t like the leader but like the vision, they get a new leader. If they don’t like the leader or the vision, they get a new leader. If they don’t like the vision but like the leader, they get a new vision.

15. The Law of Victory. Leaders find a way for the team to win. You can’t win WITHOUT good athletes, but you CAN lose with them. Unity of vision, diversity of skills plus a leader are needed for a win.

16. The Law of Momentum. You can’t steer a ship that isn’t moving forward. It takes a leader to create forward motion.

17. The Law of Priorities. Activity is not necessarily accomplishment. We need to learn the difference. A leader is the one who climbs the tallest tree, surveys the entire situation, and yells – Wrong Jungle!

18. The Law of Sacrifice. A leader must give up to go up. Successful leaders must maintain an attitude of sacrifice to turn around an organization. When you become a leader, you lose the right to think about yourself.

19. The Law of Timing. When to lead is as important as what to do and where to go. Only the right action at the right time will bring success.

20. The Law of Explosive Growth. To add growth, lead followers. To multiply growth, lead leaders. It is my job to build the people who are going to build the company.

21. The Law of Legacy. A leader’s lasting value is measured by succession. Leadership is the one thing you can’t delegate. You either exercise it – or abdicate it.

MORE GREAT BOOKS ON LEADERSHIP

FOR LEADERSHIP COACHING CONTACT ME : PETER COBBE COACHING

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